There are three types of irony. This is a prophecy that Macduff will eventually return to Scotland and make an attempt to try to ruin Macbeth in some way, or even kill him. This is called verbal irony. The expression on the face is thus to be juxtaposed to the expression known to the heart. Get free homework help on William Shakespeare's Macbeth: play summary, scene summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, character analysis, and filmography courtesy of CliffsNotes. In Act I, Scene 2, when Duncan awards Macbeth the title Thane of Cawdor, which has been taken from a traitor, the origin of the title foreshadows Macbeth's eventual betrayal of the king. After the murder of Duncan, Macbeth and his wife (Lady Macbeth) have to consider what is to be done next.

They are dramatic irony, verbal irony, and situational irony. "Lennox appears to be praising Macbeth, but he actually believes the opposite of what he says. List three phraes in which lennox is speaking ironically. This is called verbal irony. List three phraes in which lennox is speaking ironically. Macbeth says no but in reality he is always thinking about them and taking their prophecies to heart. This expression is aimed to do precisely that – keep that act within (in your heart) and pretend as if it were not you. What are three examples of verbal irony in Shakespeare's ... What are three examples of verbal irony in Shakespeare's Macbeth, Act 3 scene 6 spoken by Lennox? Explanation: When Banquo comes up to Macbeth, he tells him that he thinks about the witches all time, and asks him if he does the same in return. Dramatic irony in Macbeth Introduction: William Shakespeare effectively uses dramatic irony to intrigue the reader and deepen the impact of the consequences Macbeth ultimately faces Example of dramatic irony in macbeth act 3 scene 4. Ultimately, this prophecy foreshadows Macbeth's death at the hands of Macduff. In the novel Macbeth, William Shakespeare does an excellent job to use irony. quotLennox appears to be praising Macbeth, but he actually believes the opposite of what he says. Example: "I think not of them" (Mac.2.1.22). This ghostly entity warns Macbeth to "beware Macduff; Beware the thane of Fife." Dramatic Irony Definition: Dramatic Irony is a literary term that defines a situation in the play where the reader knows more than the character does. First of all, lets They are dramatic irony, verbal irony, and situational irony. Dramatic irony, verbal irony, and situational irony are all present in Macbeth.