Facts. Hammer v. Dagenhart (247 U.S. 251) was a U.S. Supreme Court case that dealt with the federal government attempting to regulate child labor through the Interstate Commerce Clause. Hammer divided the Court 5-4.

In 1916 Congress passed the Child Labor Act, which prohibited transporting goods between states, where the goods had been produced by manufacturers using child labor.

247 U.S. 251, 38 S. Ct. 529, 62 L. Ed. In 1918 the court ruled the Keating-Owen Act unconstitutional, stating that Congress’s regulation of interstate commerce did not include production of goods. Hammer v. Dagenhart Significance, The Keating-owen Act, The Act Is Challenged, To Regulate Or To Destroy? Facts. In Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918), however, the Court brought this line of decisions to an abrupt end. Justice Day wrote the majority opinion. Hammer v. Dagenhart Brief . U.S. Attorney General W. C. Hammer appealed the case to the Supreme Court. Many families depended on the income earned by their children. Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918) The Court ruled that under the Tenth Amendment, only the states and not the federal government could regulate child labor (on the grounds that manufacturing is not commerce and not subject to federal regulation). In Hammer v.Dagenhart, the Court considered whether Congress could prohibit the shipment of products manufactured by children.. Hammer divided the Court 5-4. Champion established the rule that Congress’s power to regulate commerce includes the power to prohibit commerce. Public concern about the effect this kind of work had on children began to rise. The Supreme Court ruled in favor for Dagenhart, nullifying the Keating-Owens act, which attempted to regulate child labor. Appellee. Dagenhart, the Court considered whether Congress could prohibit the shipment of products manufactured by children.

Hammer v. Dagenhart Case Brief - Rule of Law: The power of Congress to regulate commerce does not include the power to regulate the production of goods intended for commerce.

Roland Dagenhart, whose sons worked in a North Carolina mill, challenged the Keating-Owen law in a U.S. district court, which found it unconstitutional. Hammer v. Dagenhart involved a challenge to the federal Keating-Owen Child Labor Act, which banned goods made by child labor from shipment in interstate commerce. Hammer v. Dagenhart. Title U.S. Reports: Hammer v. Dagenhart, 247 U.S. 251 (1918).

Justice Day wrote the majority opinion. A father brought a suit on behalf of his two minor sons, seeking to enjoin enforcement of an act of Congress intended to prevent the interstate shipment of goods produced with child labor. 1918- It was not uncommon for children to work long hours in factories, mills and other industrial settings. Contributor Names Day, William Rufus (Judge) Supreme Court of the United States (Author) Should the federal government be able to tell state businesses what to do? 1101 (1918) Brief Fact Summary. Synopsis of Rule of Law. Appellant. Hammer v. Dagenhart put this question before the Court: Does the authority vested in Congress to regulate commerce among the states allow it to enact legislation targeting manufacturing practices? Citation. In Hammer v. Dagenhart, the Supreme Court was charged with assessing both the Commerce Clause and the Tenth Amendment with respect to the relative powers of federal and state governments. Advocates for child labor Appellant's Claim. Hammer v. Dagenhart involved a challenge to the federal Keating-Owen Child Labor Act, which banned goods made by child labor from shipment in interstate commerce.

Hammer v. Dagenhart.