Finally, he appears at the school.

He is depicted as a rather hypocritical man. Jane Eyre is my favorite classic novel of all time. He is portrayed as harsh hypocritical, and cruel. Carla Haughey VC Jane's first meeting with Mr. Brocklehurst is set up through the image of the "stiff" unyielding door-handle, which is perhaps hinting at Brocklehurst's character. He enjoys the power he has and enjoys doling out punishments. To be your wife is, for me, to be as happy as I can be on earth. Chapters. The later stages of the Victorian Era in England were times of. She has come to accept the poor conditions laid down by Mr. Brocklehurst, however has not yet learnt to ignore them and Bronte describes Jane suffering a … Jane's first impression of Brocklehurst is that of a "black pillar," a "straight, narrow, sable-clad shape standing erect on the rug; the grim face at the top was like a carved mask." Mr. Brocklehurst in the Essays. Charlotte Bronte. "Straight, narrow" suggests an unwillingness to bend or change their views, which is symbolic of Mr Brocklehurst's character (sees in black and white, things are right or wrong) "Grim" faced "stony stranger" is not welcoming or warm and foreshadows danger. Mr. Brocklehurst – Brocklehurst is the superintendent of Lowood School for Girls, and is in charge of their wellbeing while at Lowood. The characters of Mr. Thomas Gradgrind. Mr. Brocklehurst was here interrupted: three other visitors, ladies, now entered the room. Quotes tagged as "mr-rochester" Showing 1-12 of 12 “Good-night, my-" He stopped, bit his lip, and abruptly left me.” ― Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre.

The 35 Best Lines from Jane Eyre Kate Scott Apr 21, 2016. Mr. Brocklehurst enters the book in this chapter, ushering in the change that will alter Jane's life. Mr. Brocklehurst: This is the pedestal of infamy, and you will remain on it all day long. 707 likes. tags: jane-eyre, mr-rochester. Mr.

— such, at least, appeared to me, at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable-clad shape standing erect on the rug; the grim face at … You will have neither food nor drink for you must learn how barren is the life of a sinner. Jane Eyre is a classical novel that was written by Charlotte Bronte and originally published in 1847. At the time, the novel presented themes that were taboo or very uncommon in that era. FreeBookSummary.com . — such, at least, appeared to me, at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable-clad shape standing erect on the rug; the grim face at the top was like a … When Jane moves to Lowood School, her life appears to be similar, as she has to endure horrible taunts and punishments from Mr Brocklehurst. The Presentation of Mr. Brocklehurst in Bronte's Jane Eyre Chapter seven sees Jane slightly more experienced to the ways of Lowood School. You Are One Click Away From Getting Your Work Done.

Jane Eyre quotes about love “I would always rather be happy than dignified.” “There is no happiness like that of being loved by your fellow-creatures, and feeling that your presence is an addition to their comfort.” “’I am not an angel,’ I asserted; ‘and I will not be one till I die: I will be myself. Like “I envy you your peace of mind, your clean conscience, your unpolluted memory. They ought to have come a little sooner to have heard his lecture on dress, for … Mr. Brocklehurst himself is made clear to be an almost fanatical Christian, however he also uses it to justify his actions, by taking quotes and phrases out of context and applying them to situations he meets, such as "man shall not live by bread alone" to rebuke Miss Temple for giving the girls an extra meal when the porridge was burnt. 707 likes.

Fortunately for Jane, Mr. Brocklehurst, the financial manager of Lowood, is absent during most of this time.

And before I could draw breath, "I must not forget I have a word to say respecting her." One theme that is focused upon throughout the novel is that of religion. Mr Rochester Quotes. Jane is describing the abusive relationship she has with Mrs. Reed. After Jane and Mrs. Reed’s meeting with Mr. Brocklehurst of Lowood school, Jane confronts Mrs. Reed regarding the callous and cruel way she treats Jane. On first seeing this grim man, Jane describes him as "a black pillar! And before I could draw breath, "I must not forget I have a word to say respecting her." Children, I exhort you to shun her, exclude her, shut her out from this day forth. Jane identifies the contrast of what Mr. Brocklehurst teaches or demands of the girls at Lowood with how he and his family live. Enraged, Mr. Brocklehurst forces Jane to stand on a stool in front of the whole school and proceeds to tell them that she is a wicked liar whom the other girls should shun.

He is mean, vindictive and enjoys making the girls quiver in his presence.

Mr. Brocklehurst is the proprietor of Lowood school, a charity school for orphan girls, where Jane is to attend. In this moment, Jane releases all of her feelings about Mrs. Reed’s mistreatment over the years, and her outspoken nature starts to solidify.